The Importance of “What Worked and What did not?”

Hello Frontliners,

First off, Happy 2017! let this year be filled with continued passions and working with our children and youth with new found energy.

In working in the school system, we are surrounded my many colleagues with differences in philosophies, work ethics, and mindset. However, one thing should be consistent is our willingness to work with young people.

Sometimes I hear “There is no point, we have done everything for this child or youth.”

Me: “What is everything?”

The importance as a frontline and educator is to ensure we get the opportunity to document what we did. I preach this to placement students: so what worked? What did not work? and how can we move forward?

Because if we do not show evidence then it is hard to believe that we did everything for this young person. At this point, I am looking at this young person as a blank slate, the untouchable, or starting from scratch.

Although, I might be a new worker with a fresh new perspective, the young person will not change their personality or habits to the point where if I implement the same program that was done a year ago which resulted in a huge mess, they will not magically start reacting any differently.

All in part of the feedback process- haha…my past students are probably cussing me as they read this blog…

BUT! We need to be critical.

As a researcher-practitioner, we need to be critical and evaluative in our interactions with young people.

No! We are not perfect, but from experience…it shows the young person that we care enough about their motivators.

If we are fighting for advocacy for our young people, one of the core values we should possess as frontliners is NEVER GIVING UP! Because…

We will find creative ways for them to reach their goals

We will find out their strengths

WE WILL PROBLEM SOLVE.

Thanks for reading 🙂

Marleigh

 

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